Religious patterns added at the String Art Fun website

Six new string art patterns have been added to the String Art Fun website. The religious patterns are a plain cross, a decorative cross, a cross on a hill, a dove, a girl praying and an angel.

The pattern size is approximately 300 mm x 210 mm (12 x 8½ inches). They are delivered by download to your computer in PDF format.

The patterns are available individually and in a value pack of six patterns for the price of five individual patterns.

The patterns are in the Religious section of the String Art Fun website.

Using string art to teach maths in a fun way

An article on the String Art Fun website describes a way of using string art as a fun way to teach math to second or the third grade pupils. The children are given a sheet of multiplication sums to solve. Once they have the answers they can use them to create a geometric design. The design can be either drawn on a supplied template, stitched on card using thread and an embroidery needle or created on a board with nails and string.

For more details and a sample work sheet visit the Notes for teachers section of the String Art Fun website.

Free Heart Circle Pattern at String Art Fun website

Make a picture for your loved one with the free heart circle string art pattern to be found at the String Art Fun website. The design, that creates a heart within a circle, was inspired by a curve stitching pattern based on a mathematical formula.

As well as creating this heart circle with nails and string you can also create it as a greetings card with a pattern from the Pinbroidery website.

Free sea shell pattern at the String Art Fun web site

sea shell string art patternA sea shell string art pattern has been added to the free pattern section of the String Art Fun web site. If you are a string art enthusiast or would like to have a go at string art this is an easy pattern to start with.

I designed the pattern following a request from string art enthusiast Linda, who said “I am a teacher in a low-income area and would really like to have my students create a nautilus shell using string art”.

Candle pattern now available for prick and stitch card making

The free string art candle pattern on this web site has now been converted to a prick and stitch greetings card pattern. This follows a number of requests from card making enthusiasts who would like to try it as a greetings card. It is available from my Prick And Stitch Is My Craft blog.

candleThe illustration shows the card stitched using Kreinik 1 ply polyester metallic cord. The base is antique gold, the candle red and the flame gold.

Prick and stitch card making has much in common with string art. Instead of nails and string it uses needle and thread on a much smaller greetings card size format.

String Art Fun Christmas patterns reviewed

There is still time to make some quick and easy string art pictures as Christmas decorations. String Art Fun Value Pack No. 2: Christmas available from the String Art Fun web site has six patterns made using colourful drawing pins (thumb tacks) together with sparkly decorative cords and ribbons to give a festive look to the pictures. Continue reading

Choosing string for making string art pictures

cross stitch cottonThe best place to look for string for your string art pictures is your local craft store. The characteristics to look for in the ideal string are:

1. Strength.
2. The right elasticity.
3. The right thickness.

If your craft store has a cross stitch section then the multi-stranded cotton sold for this is perfect. It comes in lots of bright colours and has the right elasticity and thickness. If they do a value pack with a number of different colours then that is the one I would go for,

You could also look in the knitting wool section. If you can find silver wool it would be good choice for string art. Silver shows up particularly well against a black background.

I was in my local craft store recently and as it is getting close to Christmas they have all sorts of coloured strings for making decorations. It is worth buying a few different types just to experiment with.

What is your favourite stringing material? Please let us know in a comment to this post.

Free string art candle pattern to download and print

I have created an easy string art candle picture. This would make an attractive picture for Christmas, a religious occasion or just to hang on your wall. The downloadable pattern includes a numbered diagram, stringing instructions and general instructions for the technique.

candleThe illustration shows a red candle in a gold holder on a black background. You can string the candle in colours of your choice. You could even do multiple candle pictures in different colours, either on the same backing board or on different boards.

If you would like to try my pattern you can download it from the following link:

Download free string art candle pattern

The pattern is in a PDF file and you will need Adobe Reader to view and print it. Adobe Reader software can be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe website.

Please let me know how you get on with this pattern by using the comment link below.

To drill or not to drill, that is the question – string art nailing

drillSince we are using nails to create our string art picture you may wonder why I am asking about drilling. The answer will depend on the material you are using for your baseboard. It may also depend on the size of nails you are using.

If you are using a base that is easily penetrated by nails such as cork of soft fibre board then the nails will go in easily with just a hammer. If you are using a harder base such as plywood or MDF (medium density fibreboard) then pre-drilling the holes can make the nailing easier and more accurate.

Chose a drill bit that is smaller than the nails you are going to use. You do not want the nails to fall through the holes. They should be a tight fit when nailed in.

I use a small battery powered drill. It has a built in spirit level on the top and back so it is easy to judge when it is vertical.

Fix your paper template onto your baseboard with tape or similar. Drill through the dots and then remove the template. You can now hammer your nails into the drilled holes.